Tuesday, January 29, 2013

As Time Goes By...

It is amazing how time flies by.  It seems like just yesterday when I was standing up at the podium paying my respects to those who serve for our freedom.  Well, that was two months ago.  Wow.  Life is busy.  Especially as a single parent of a competitive softball player.  I believe the most used word in our vocabulary these days is "hurry".  The exact opposite of how I like to live my life.  It is no wonder why my daughter runs so fast.

So what else have I been up to?   Lots.  And even though I have not posted anything I have many stories brewing and have also made some great contacts over the last few months. Please keep checking back as I start to add these stories to the site. 

Mark Kotlovker, son of Aleutian Island WW2 vet Jack Kotlovker has been incredibly patient with my slow movement.  I see him regularly at my daughters school.  Many months ago he had given me over one hundred photos of his Fathers time in Alaska.  It has been my top priority to create an electronic library of his fathers treasured wartime photos.  I am happy to say that after several hours and one, now dysfunctional,  memory card,  the project is finished.   What a gift those were.  Thank you Mark.  Below are some of my favorite ones. 

Wartime Thimble Theater.
Some kind of Russian sign.  I am guessing this must have been around the Nome area

The communications men at work on a pole.

Shoveling out the Bank of Kodiak.

Three Sisters mountains covered in white.

Jack outside his quarters.

Quonset Hut.

Temporary relief in a drink.
Communications at work.

His abode atop Signal Hill. They called it the Fubar Reservation.

Looking east atop Signal Hill.

Jack.  What a great smile!

To read more about Jack's story click here.  It appears that I have quite a few favorites.  They are all so fascinating.  Stay tuned as I will share the rest of them on another day... 

1 comment:

  1. Thought you might like to know that your 2nd and 10th pics posted include examples of Russian grave markers. The three crossbars (bottom one slanted) identify the Byzantine cross of Russian Orthodoxy. For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthodox_cross